Pathway Requirements

Coursework (Three Courses)

Students will complete three courses from different departments within the following interest categories. Students are welcome to pursue various courses from multiple Interest Categories, provided that these decisions are made in consultation with a Pathway advisor, and that the student articulates the reasons for these selections in a written reflection in the form of a proposal and rationale as addressed above.

Approved coursework in this interest area provides students with guided opportunities to understand how human cultures, histories, communities, and identities are (and are not) represented in museums. Students completing coursework in this area may also identify legal and ethical issues in ethnographic collections and displays.

  • ANTH-11000: Introduction to Anthropology
  • ANTH-21107: Museum Anthropology
  • IDPT-29900: Museums & Political Conflict
  • RELS-26925: Religious Visual & Material Culture
  • RELS-26740: Buddhist Visual & Material Cultures
  • RELS-26745: Materiality and Spirit

*Course has pre-requisite or requires instructor permission to register

These are courses that encourage students to explore the methods, techniques, and reasoning employed to reconstruct and interpret past societies out of material and visual records. Ethical questions should arise for students completing coursework in this area surrounding the religious, social, political, economic, and cultural conditions of representation and discovery.

  • ARCH-10300: Intro to Archaeology
  • ARCH-20900: Special Topics in Archaeology (selected courses must be approved by Pathway Team)
  • ARCH-35000: Archaeology Method and Theory*
  • ARTH-22000: African Art (when it includes a course embedded exhibition)
  • ARTH-20800: Global Renaissance* (when it includes a course embedded exhibition)
  • ARTH-33000: Exhibiting Africa: Art, Objects & Bodies*
  • EAST-11000: Introduction to East Asia
  • HIST-27512: Ancient Arabian Religions

*Course has pre-requisite or requires instructor permission to register

Coursework in this interest area allows students to engage with histories and methods of curating & preserving written, visual, physical, and digital texts.

  • ARTH-31800: History of Prints* (with or without EL course embedded exhibition)
  • ENGL-23007: Nineteenth Century British Literature
  • ENGL 23040: Global? Book? History?
  • FYS-10100: Grow a Spine: Arts of the Book
  • IDPT-19916 Introduction to Digital Humanities
  • RELS-26740 Buddhist Visual & Material Cultures
  • THTD-10100: Theater Research and Writing
  • THTD-25200: Origins of Drama

*Course has pre-requisite or requires instructor permission to register

  • ARTH-22000: African Art (when it includes a course-embedded exhibition)
  • ARTH-29902: Global Renaissance (when it includes a course-embedded exhibition)
  • ARTH-31800: History of Prints* (with or without EL course embedded exhibition)
  • ARTH-33000: Exhibiting Africa: Art, Objects & Bodies*
  • ARTH-38900: Theory & Application in Art History*
  • ARTS-15300: Introduction to Painting*
  • ARTS-15500: Intro to Printmaking
  • ARTS-15900: Intro to Photography
  • ARTS-16300: Intro to Ceramics
  • RELS-26925: Religious Visual & Material Culture
  • RELS-26740: Buddhist Visual & Material Cultures
  • RELS-26745: Materiality and Spirit
  • IDPT-29901-01: Museums & Political Conflict

Approved courses related to museums of natural history should contribute to students’ applied understandings of evolutionary history and ecology. Students should draw ideas from this coursework on how to incorporate such understandings into the curation, conservation, and education of natural history.

  • ARTH-39900: Exhibiting Africa: Art, Objects & Bodies*
  • BIOL-35000: Population and Community Ecology*
  • BIOL-35600: Conservation Biology*
  • BIOL-31100: Natural History of the Vertebrates*
  • BIOL-32300: Natural History of the Invertebrates*
  • BIOL-34000: Field Botany*
  • BIOL-39900: Plant-Insect Interactions
  • ESCI-10000: History of Life
  • ESCI-19901: GIS Basics
  • ESCI-21500: Paleoecology*

*Course has pre-requisite or requires instructor permission to register

Approved coursework in this interest area should help students imagine how displays of histories, traditions, and cultures are produced, distributed, and received in various forms. Students may be challenged to consider legacies of conquest, colonialism, and other political or economic influences in working with original historical materials.

  • EAST-11000: Introduction to East Asia
  • ENGL-23040: Global? Book? History?
  • GMDS-11000: Introduction to Global Media & Digital Studies
  • GMDS-21000: Global Media*
  • HIST-20124: Public History*
  • HIST-29800: Making History: Theory & Methods
  • HIST-23100: The Making of Africa
  • HIST-23200: Africa from Colonization to Globalization
  • HIST-23400: Chinese Civilization
  • HIST-23500: Modern China
  • HIST-23600: Modern Japan
  • THTD-10100: Theater Research & Writing
  • THTD-25200: Origins of Drama

*Course has pre-requisite or requires instructor permission to register

Students may also consider organizing their own set of courses out of these options, by submitting a proposal to the Museam and Archival Studies Pathway Team.

Experiential Learning Opportunities (One Experience)

Students will complete one experience that meets the following description: Substantial/sustained off-campus internship, work experience, or volunteer opportunity, in the area of student’s interests and goals, which will include a formal reflection on quality and quality of engagement. Approved experiential learning opportunities should give students firsthand, guided experience working with digital, physical, written, or visual materials. Such opportunities include:

  • Work/work study experience on campus
  • Special Collections
  • Digital Collections
  • Ebert’s Digital Lab in CWAM
  • Wooster Digital History Project
  • Work experience off-campus
  • Internships off-campus
  • Internships on-campus
  • Research Assistantships  
  • Field Research
  • Volunteer work such as docent and museum education or outreach
  • Shadowing Experiences with Alumni
  • Related Off-Campus Study programs

Reflection

  • Reflective exercises at the beginning, middle and end of the pathway
  • Reflections guide students to articulate meaningful connections between the skills and knowledge they are gaining and the experiences in their coursework, experiential learning opportunities and career goals.
  • Reflections take place along five points in the pathway:
    • First Reflection Touchpoint: At the Start of the Pathway
      • The first opportunity to reflect is when the student declares their Pathway.  Responses to prompts asked at this moment establish a baseline from which student moves forward.
    • Second Reflection Touchpoint: An Opportunity to Investigate
      • This is an opportunity for students to dig deeper to articulate what they are learning along the Pathway in classes and about experiential learning options related to the interests they shared in the first reflection. It is also a point at which to prepare for experiential learning/career exploration.
    • Third Reflection Touchpoint: Before Experiential Learning Opportunity
      • This reflection takes place as a student is learning about experiential learning opportunities related to their pathway.
    • Fourth Reflection Touchpoint: After Experiential Learning Opportunity
      • This reflection takes place after the student has completed an experiential learning opportunity and asks them to consider how the work they have done connects with their pathway.
    • Fifth Reflection Touchpoint: At the End of This Pathway - and the Start of New Ones
      • At this touchpoint, students engage with questions that help them build connections between theory and practice, their career goals, and how they plan to extend their Pathway beyond Wooster.