Ryan S. Arvidson

Visiting Assistant Professor - BCMB, Biology

Office: Severance 213
Phone: 330-287-1907
Email: rarvidson@wooster.edu

Degrees

  • A.S, Antelope Valley College 2002
  • B.S., Humboldt State University 2007
  • M.S. University of California - Riverside 2013
  • Ph.D., University of California - Riverside 2016

Courses Taught

  • BCMB 331: Principles of Biochemistry
  • BIOL 201: Gateway to Molecular & Cellular Biology

Awards and Professional Memberships

  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
  • American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
  • Society for Neuroscience (SfN)
  • Distinguished Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching, UC Riverside Graduate Division (2015)
  • Sinclair Award for Outstanding Teaching Assistant, UC Riverside Department of Biochemistry (2013-2014 academic year)
  • Sinclair Award for Outstanding Teaching Assistant, UC Riverside Department of Biochemistry (2012-2013 academic year)
  • Award for Best Oral Presentation, UC Riverside Department of Biochemistry Annual Symposium (2015)
  • Award for Best Oral Presentation, UC Riverside Department of Biochemistry Annual Symposium (2013)
  • Randolph T. and Mary K. Wedding Travel Award, UC Riverside Department of Biochemistry (2016)
  • Graduate Research Mentorship Fellowship, UC Riverside Graduate Division (2014)

Research Interests

I am interested in basic biology questions regarding pharmacology and structure-function of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediating neuronal and synaptic phenomena. I explore this area of study by taking two synergistic, discovery-based approaches: 1. computational biology and bioinformatics to generate and curate datasets from which hypotheses can be developed and 2. molecular and cell biology approaches to functional analysis and hypothesis testing.

Secondly, I continue research into the mechanism of action of emerald cockroach wasp venom. Proteomic and phylogenetic analysis has revealed several clades of novel peptides and proteins. The venom is known to be neuromodulatory, yet non-cytotoxic. Characterizing representative members of these gene families may reveal new tools and mechanisms of manipulating the behavior of insect nervous systems.