How the Brain Categorizes, Memorizes, and Recognizes Own-Race and Other-Race Faces

 

Dr. Herzmann will present her and her students’ research on face processing focusing especially on the so-called “other-race effect,” the phenomenon that people process faces from their own race differently than from another race. The effect is very robust but can be diminished by extensive, personal experience with people from other races. Understanding the neural basis of the other-race effect can help find way to reduce the other-race effect and its influence on social interaction.

 

 

 

Professor Herzmann is Associate Professor of Psychology and Chair of Neuroscience, and advised on the development of this exhibition.

 

October 28th

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Location:
Ebert Art Center 223


2021-10-28 6:30:00 2021-10-28 8:00:00 America/New_York How the Brain Categorizes, Memorizes, and Recognizes Own-Race and Other-Race Faces

 

Dr. Herzmann will present her and her students’ research on face processing focusing especially on the so-called “other-race effect,” the phenomenon that people process faces from their own race differently than from another race. The effect is very robust but can be diminished by extensive, personal experience with people from other races. Understanding the neural basis of the other-race effect can help find way to reduce the other-race effect and its influence on social interaction.

 

 

 

Professor Herzmann is Associate Professor of Psychology and Chair of Neuroscience, and advised on the development of this exhibition.

 

Ebert Art Center 223