Overview

What can I do with a biology degree from The College of Wooster?

Students who major in biology at Wooster benefit from small class sizes, extensive lab facilities, and faculty who work closely with undergraduates to help them pursue specialty interests. As a result, many graduates in biology enter the fields of medicine, veterinary medicine, environmental law, exercise physiology, fisheries management, public health and academia. About half the graduates of the program go on to graduate or professional schools, with a great track record of acceptance into top research universities in the United States. Wooster’s partnerships with hospitals, universities and cultural institutions give students a vibrant network and access to internships and jobs after graduation.

Biology at The College of Wooster

Faculty members in biology are focused on undergraduate teaching and research, and student are encouraged early on to make connections and build on their skills in experimental design and hypothesis testing. The Ruth W. Williams Hall of Life Science offers students updated research laboratories and includes a vivarium for animal studies and a greenhouse. The Fern Valley Field Station is a dedicated field research site available to biology students. All students at The College of Wooster complete independent study under the guidance of a faculty member, culminating in a thesis delivered in the spring semester of their senior year.


Faculty

Nick Brandley

Nick Brandley

Assistant Professor of Biology

nbrandley@wooster.edu

Hilary Edgington

Hilary Edgington

Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology

hedgington@wooster.edu

Dean Fraga

Dean Fraga

Danforth Professor of Biology; Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

dfraga@wooster.edu

Jennifer Ison

Jennifer Ison

Associate Professor of Biology

jison@wooster.edu

Seth Kelly

Seth Kelly

Associate Professor of Biology, Neuroscience

skelly@wooster.edu

Richard Lehtinen
Beth Lingenfelter

Beth Lingenfelter

Administrative Coordinator - Biology, Environmental Studies, Neuroscience

bsnyder@wooster.edu

Sharon Lynn

Sharon Lynn

Horace N. Mateer Professor of Biology, Neuroscience

slynn@wooster.edu

Courtney McCusker

Courtney McCusker

Laboratory Technician - Biology

cmcmcusker@wooster.edu

Jhony Mera

Electronics & Instrument Technician - Biology, Chemistry, Physics

jmera@wooster.edu

Bill Morgan

William Morgan

Theron L. Peterson and Dorothy R. Peterson Professor of Biology; Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

wmorgan@wooster.edu

Julie Pringle

Julie Pringle

Animal Caretaker, Biology

jpringle@wooster.edu

Erzsebet Regan

Erzsebet Regan

Whitmore-Williams Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Biology

eregan@wooster.edu

Timothy Siegenthaler

Timothy Siegenthaler

Instrument and Lab Tech/Machinist - Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics

tsiegenthaler@wooster.edu

Laura Sirot

Laura Sirot

Associate Professor of Biology

lsirot@wooster.edu

Stephanie Strand

Stephanie Strand

Associate Professor and Department Chair of Biology; Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

sstrand@wooster.edu

James West

James West

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Biology; Chemistry

jwest@wooster.edu

Rebecca Williams

Rebecca Williams

John Garber Drushal Distinguished Visiting Professor of Biology

rwilliams@wooster.edu


Latest News

Grant Sprague ’22

Biology major puts techniques into practice at Wilderness Center

Grant Sprague ’22, a biology major and environmental studies minor, who is also on the cross country and track & field teams interned at […]

Virginia Roberts

Resource-driven control of cavity-nesting wasp densities

Name: Virginia E. Roberts Major: Biology Minor: Environmental Studies Advisors: Dr. Carlo Moreno, Dr. Jennifer Ison (second reader) Cavity nesting wasps are contributors to […]

Michael Alber

Autumn Flowering Wingstem’s Seed Set, Floral Display Size and Flowering Time as an Indicator of Climate Change

Name: Michael David Alber Major: Biology Advisors: Dr. Jennifer Ison and Dr. Stephenie Strand Climate change has led to shifts in the phenology of […]

Exploring the Impact of the Microbiome on Sleep Homeostasis in Drosophila melanogaster

Name: Joshua Gluck Major: Biology Advisors: Dr. Stephanie Strand, Dr. Sharon Lynn (second reader) The study of the Brain-Gut-Microbiome axis is an exciting avenue […]

Major

Through its curriculum, the Biology Department seeks to develop students who:

  • comprehend foundational and unifying biological principles and their implications
  • retain the knowledge essential to a broad understanding of Biology
  • are familiar with scientific methods of inquiry and the philosophy of science, including methodologies for distilling biological information
  • are able to design and conduct an independent scientific investigation
  • can use scientific information to make reasoned decisions and critically evaluate the work of others
  • are able to communicate scientific information effectively
  • show evidence that they understand how knowledge changes
  • are motivated to think, study and learn independently

Biology majors take 14 courses related to their major, as well as foundational courses in the liberal arts and electives.  A sample of the course sequence for biology majors over four years:

First year

  • Foundations of Biology and Gateway to Molecular & Cellular Biology or Gateway to Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
  • General Chemistry I
  • General Chemistry II

Sophomore year

  • Gateway to Molecular & Cellular Biology or
    Gateway to Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
  • Research Skills in Biology
  • One or two 300-level electives

Junior year

  • Independent Study and Biostatistics (original research with a thesis proposal due at the end of the course)
  • Two 300-level electives

Senior year

  • Independent Study thesis
  • One or two 300-level electives

View Courses

Minor

To earn a minor in biology, students complete six courses, including:

  • Foundations of Biology
  • Gateway to Molecular & Cellular Biology
  • Gateway to Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
  • Three elective 300-level biology courses, one of which must have a laboratory component

View Courses

Independent Study

The study of biology at Wooster culminates with three courses of Independent Study. Each student works one-on-one with a faculty member to develop a proposal, complete a yearlong research project, and write a thesis based on the results.

In these individualized research experiences, students develop the capacity for self-education, problem solving, and effective communication. Students commonly conduct their Independent Study research on campus, but many have worked off campus in conjunction with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, the National Institutes of Health and Mental Health, Cleveland Clinic, or in a variety of NSF-sponsored Undergraduate Research Experiences across the country.

Biology I.S. projects cover a wide range of topics, including the effects of air pollution on lichen populations, the role of the protein neurontin-1 in mediating hyperexcitation of cultured nerve cells, and the elucidation of gene function using RNA interference.

Wooster undergraduates have published their research in such journals as Evolution, Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, The Journal of Avian Biology, and the Journal of Neurology, and regularly present their results at professional meetings such as the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, the Ecological Society of America, the Endocrine Society, and the Society for Neuroscience, or at workshops and symposia.

 

Search the I.S. Database

Student Year I.S. Title Major 1 Major 2 Advisor
Please search to view results

Related Articles

Virginia Roberts

Resource-driven control of cavity-nesting wasp densities

Name: Virginia E. Roberts Major: Biology Minor: Environmental Studies Advisors: Dr. Carlo Moreno, Dr. Jennifer Ison (second reader) Cavity nesting wasps are contributors to […]

Michael Alber

Autumn Flowering Wingstem’s Seed Set, Floral Display Size and Flowering Time as an Indicator of Climate Change

Name: Michael David Alber Major: Biology Advisors: Dr. Jennifer Ison and Dr. Stephenie Strand Climate change has led to shifts in the phenology of […]

Exploring the Impact of the Microbiome on Sleep Homeostasis in Drosophila melanogaster

Name: Joshua Gluck Major: Biology Advisors: Dr. Stephanie Strand, Dr. Sharon Lynn (second reader) The study of the Brain-Gut-Microbiome axis is an exciting avenue […]

Lauryn Hill

Male fitness of perennial plant Echinacea angustifolia is not significantly influenced through visitation by specific bee taxa

Name: Lauryn Hill Major: Biology Advisor: Jennifer Ison Habitat fragmentation is the disruption of continuous blocks of land that reduce the size and increases […]

Alumni

Wooster graduates with degrees in biology have chosen careers in a broad range of fields, from medicine, biological research, veterinary medicine, environmental law, exercise physiology, and cytotechnology, to art illustration, teaching, wildlife and fisheries management, evolutionary biology, and public health.


Related Articles

Vedica Jha '18 at the Kauke Arch in 2019

Biology and math alumna co-founds startup

Vedica Jha ’18 credits Wooster’s support system for preparing her to create talent-finding platform, ProMytheUs

In February, Chelsea Barnes '07 lobbied the Virginia Legislature for a grant to develop renewable energy on former coal-mined land.

Biology alumna honored for clean energy work

Chelsea Barnes ’07 strikes the balance between working with her community to promote solar energy and creating environmental policy

Shawn Sweeney ’06

Jane Goodall Institute’s associate VP of communications developed commitment to conservation at Wooster

Shawn Sweeney ’06 impacted by strong female mentors

Andrew Bishop

Andrew Bishop ’05

A grad with a passion for conservation biology

Lectures

Pelican Lecture

The Biology Department sponsors a bi-annual lecture in honor of Dr. Ralph Schreiber. Dr. Schreiber was a graduate of the College of Wooster, noted for his work on seabirds, including pelicans. His parents, the late Clare Adel and William Schreiber, were long term residents of and contributors to the Wooster Community and endowed this lecture in Ralph’s memory.

Lab Facilities

Ruth W. Williams Greenhouse

The top floor of the Ruth W. Williams Hall of Life Science houses a four-season greenhouse to support teaching and research at the College of Wooster. The greenhouse is named ‘Ibby’s Place’ in memory of Dr. Elizabeth ‘Ibby’ Coyle, Danforth Professor of Biology and teacher of Botany from 1926-1972. Daily operations and equipment for the greenhouse are made possible through a generous donation from Paul and Carol Lamberger, members of the class of 1959 and 1960, respectively, and their son, David Lamberger, class of 1992.

The greenhouse has three separate climate-controlled chambers, a plant potting area, and storage space. Each greenhouse chamber has moveable benches, an irrigation system, a heating and cooling system, and supplemental lighting.

Fern Valley Field Station

The Fern Valley Field Station is the College of Wooster’s outdoor facility to encourage scientific research, environmental education, and nature study. Graciously donated to the College by Betty and David Wilkin in 2012, Fern Valley is a 56 acre tract of wooded land in northern Holmes Co., Ohio and has already hosted visits from hundreds of students, faculty and researchers. Classes from the Biology and Geology Departments at the College frequently visit the site for field experience.

The property is located in a primarily agricultural landscape and one with many Amish neighbors. One of the primary features of the property is a second-order stream and several smaller streams that feed into it. The hilltops, valleys and ravines associated with these streams provide much of the topography associated with the property.

The forest is older second growth with an unusually high number of Ohio Buckeyes (Aesculus glabra). Other common trees include: Black Cherry (Prunus serotina), American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) and Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis).

Ongoing long-term research from faculty in the Biology and Earth Sciences Departments at the College of Wooster include general biodiversity surveys, studies of salamander ecology, invasive plant impacts, and the effects of deer browsing.

Facilities and Resources

The short access road leads to a small parking area. Nearby is a small cabin (constructed in 2015) that can be used for research or educational purposes. Basic field equipment and facilities for collecting and processing samples are available on site. Long-term data on climate at the Station and water flow in the streams are regularly collected. A list of known woody plants and vertebrate species from Fern Valley is also regularly updated. A number of established and marked trails are available (with more under development).

Contact

Parties interested in visiting or conducting scientific research at the Fern Valley Field Station should contact the Director, Dr. Rick Lehtinen.

View a research poster on the Geologic History and Hydrology of Fern Valley